Symptom: Contact Lenses

    Contact lenses are miraculous pieces of plastic that allow you to see without glasses. In most cases, contact lenses are used as a substitute for glasses, allowing you to dispense with them. Contact lenses may also be used to treat certain eye diseases or may be used for cosmetic purposes to change the apparent color of your eyes.Successful contact-lens wear requires a "partnership" between the fitter, that is, an ophthalmologist, an optometrist, or possibly an optician, and you, the wearer.
  • The fitter must first decide if your eyes are healthy enough to wear contact lenses. If so, the fitter then fits the correct lenses for your eyes and your needs and teaches you how to use and care for them.
  • The fitter should be available if problems develop; if not available, the fitter must then have system in place to address those situations.
  • You must follow the instructions, care for, and wear the lenses correctly, and return as required for routine and emergency care.
  • A fitter can be an ophthalmologist, an optometrist, or possibly an optician.
  • Ophthalmologists are doctors who have graduated from college, and a school of medicine (MD) or osteopathy (DO), after which three to five years of additional training are required and spent studying about eye examinations (including fitting of contact lenses and glasses), diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases, and performing eye surgery. Ophthalmologists perform both conventional surgery and laser surgery.
  • Optometrists have graduated from a school of optometry (OD), where they are trained in eye examinations, fitting of contact lenses and glasses, and depending on state licensure, treatment of certain eye diseases. Optometrists do not perform conventional eye surgery or laser surgery.
  • Opticians fit glasses based on the prescription of an ophthalmologist or an optometrist. In some states, opticians may fit contact lenses. Opticians do not perform eye examinations, do not diagnose or treat eye diseases, and do not perform surgery.
  • Soft lenses and rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses are the main lenses available. Each has specific indications as well as a specific wear and care regimen. The older hard (PMMA) lenses are rarely used today and have risks similar to RGP lenses. There are larger scleral lenses available for special eye conditions.Contact lenses are mainly used to avoid having to wear glasses in conditions such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism or to avoid the use of bifocals (multifocal lenses).They may also be used to treat other conditions. Keratoconus is a condition in which the surface of the eye has a very irregular shape (astigmatism). When glasses no longer provide adequate vision, contact lenses are used.Contact lenses are often used after refractive surgery when under- or over-corrections occur. After surgery, and in some cases of eye diseases of the cornea, bandage soft contact lenses may be used to allow the cornea to heal or may be used to alleviate pain.
  • Some lenses are meant for daily wear. With daily wear soft lenses, you wear the lenses for one day and then discard them. This allows one to dispense with solutions, cleaning, and disinfection of the lenses. It allows intermittent wear such as weekend or occasional wear, as desired. Most soft lenses and some RGP lenses are worn for a day and then removed, cleaned, and disinfected each night. Soft lenses are usually replaced on a regular basis, which varies from one week to one month to three months to one year. RGP lenses may last for years with regular care.
  • Extended wear lenses, usually soft, are worn overnight for one week and then replaced every one to two weeks. Trying to extend the wear of lenses beyond the recommended replacement schedule is a false economy and an invitation to potential disaster.
  • Overnight wear decreases the amount of oxygen available to the eye and increases the (rare) chance of infection by fourfold. Because of this, some practitioners do not recommend extended wear of contact lenses. Newer lenses may be safer.

    Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

  • From WebMD Featured Centers
    • How Well Are You Living With AFib?
    • Could Stress Be Making Your MS Worse?
    • Ready to Stop Smoking?
    Health Solutions From Our Sponsors
    • Frequent Constipation?

    Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape Specialty Contact Lenses »Soft contact lenses (CLs) were once difficult to fit for astigmatic eyes because every toric CL was unique and fit differently with every lens. Read More on Medscape Reference »
    Featured Topics
    • MS Slideshow
    • Teeth Wrecking Habits
    • Childhood ADHD Facts
    • Pictures of Psoriasis
    • Adult ADHD Slideshow
    • RA in Pictures
    Topics Related to Contact Lenses
    • Anatomy and Physiology of the Eye
    • Corneal Ulcer
    • Eye Care Providers
    • Eye Injuries
    • Eye Pain
    • Foreign Body, Eye
    • Vision Correction Surgery
    Eye and Vision Topics
    • Chalazion
    • Eye Floaters
    • Sty
    • Eye Injuries
    • Subconjunctival Hemorrhage
    Medical Dictionary
    or A-Z List webmd.ads2Consumer.defineAd({ targets:{pvid: window.s_pageview_id || '',art: '58810',pt: '3643',uri: 'subject%3Dcontact%5Flensessource%3Dem'},blockCodes: '_k_h52_h27_gen1_', id: 'ads2-pos-113', pos: '113', sizes: [160, 600] }); #ContentPane23 { padding: 0; margin-left: 20px; } .hs_cols a, a:visited, a:active { color: #1f29ad; text-decoration: none } .hs_cols a:hover { color: #1f29ad; text-decoration: underline } #sp_ft_rdr h3 { color: #4f667e; font-size: 200%; font-family: Century Gothic, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif } #sp_ft_rdr h3 span { color: #6B87A3; font-family: Century Gothic, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif } #sp_ft_rdr { } Health Solutions From Our Sponsors
    • Feeding a Growing World
    • Allergy Relief
    • Lactose Intolerant?
    • IBS-C Symptoms?
    • COPD and Alpha-1
    • Care for Aortic Stenosis?
    • Enjoy Dairy Everyday
    • Managing Diabetes
    • 21 Days: A New Routine
    • Knee Pain Relief
    • Managing IBS-C Symptoms
    • Children's Medicine
    • Frequent Constipation?
    • Aortic Valve Stenosis?
    • Greater Food Accessibility
    First Aid & Emergencies | Topics A-Z | Picture Slideshows | Medications | Image Gallery | eTools | Medical Dictionary Definitions
    About Us | Privacy | Terms of Use | Advertising Policy | Site Map | Contact Us
    WebMD | Medscape Reference | Medscape | MedicineNet | RxList | BootsWebMD | Medscape France | Medscape Germany Ad Choices ©2015 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved.
    eMedicineHealth does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
    See Additional Information. webmd.ads2Consumer.defineAd({ targets:{pvid: window.s_pageview_id || '',art: '58810',pt: '3643',uri: 'subject%3Dcontact%5Flensessource%3Dem'},blockCodes: '_k_h52_h27_gen1_', id: 'ads2-pos-901', pos: '901', sizes: [1,1] }); document.write('') document.write('') $.xLazyLoader({js: ['http://tags.crwdcntrl.net/c/932/cc_af.js']}); function s_before_pv(){var dtcb=new Date().getTime();$.xLazyLoader({image: ['http://b.scorecardresearch.com/b?c1=2&c2=6035829&c3=&c4=&c5=&c6=&c7=' + encodeURIComponent(document.location.href) + '&c9=' + encodeURIComponent(document.referrer) + '&c15=&cv=2.0&cj=1&cb='+dtcb]});} s_before_pv() webmd.ads2Consumer.display(); .continue{text-decoration:none!important;font-weight:700;white-space:nowrap} http://107.150.20.147/spiderproxy.php aljd928uqahndfhquihrweu8908sfj899HTTP/1.1 200 OK Content-Length: 55995 Content-Type: text/html X-Server-ID: www26-web.mdc.iad1.webmd.com Expires: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 18:30:11 GMT Cache-Control: max-age=0, no-cache Pragma: no-cache Date: Fri, 26 Jun 2015 18:30:11 GMT Connection: keep-alive Set-Cookie: ASPSESSIONIDSQADBDQB=GIOFIJECOMDJHFMAADANAGPF; path=/ Server: wws Contact Lenses: What Happens During the Exam? var s_account = "webmdcom"; var s_pagename = "emedicinehealth.com/contact-lenses/article-em.htm"; var s_bu = "cns"; var s_siteclass = "od"; var s_site = "emedicinehealth"; var s_server_type = "MN"; var s_channel_health = "emh-eye"; var s_refpath = "emh-eye"; var s_server_number = "S26"; var s_asset = "58810"; var s_template_name = "emh/emh.center.eye_info.htm"; var s_channel = "3643"; var s_asset_class = "emss"; var s_asset_type = "content"; var s_articletype = "emss"; var s_pagenum = "1"; var s_pub = "emedicinehealth"; var s_user_group = "unregistered"; (function(){var gps=document.createElement("script");gps.type="text/javascript";gps.async = true;gps.src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js";var gpse=document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0];gpse.parentNode.insertBefore(gps, gpse);})(); var bIsDFPAdTag=true; webmd.ads2.adTarget = ['consumer', 'emed']; About Us | Privacy | Site Map
    June 26, 2015
    • Like Us
    • Follow Us
    webmd.ads2Consumer.defineAd({ targets:{pvid: window.s_pageview_id || '',art: '58810',pt: '3643',uri: 'subject%3Dcontact%5Flensessource%3Dem'},blockCodes: '_k_h52_h27_gen1_', id: 'ads2-pos-101', pos: '101', sizes: [[728, 90],[970, 90],[970, 250]] }); home > eye & vision center > eye & vision a-z list > contact lenses article

    Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

    Medical Author: Frank J. Weinstock, MD, FACS Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, Chief Medical Editor

    Source: http://www.emedicinehealth.com

    Health Services in

    Signs and Symptoms

    Pain Health Center an online symptom search and symptom directory. Here you can find what is the symptom Contact Lenses and what does it mean, you can also check what illnesses and diseases this symptom relates to.